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Plastic bottles marked #1 (PETE) and #2 (HDPE) are recyclable in most communities. This includes: shampoo, conditioners, body wash, lotion, baby powder, face cleanser, and body oil.

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Plastic marked #4 (LDPE) and #5 (PP) may not be accepted for recycling via curbside programs. Check with your municipality and the Earth911 recycling locator. Some #5 (PP) plastics may also be recycled via drop-off or mail-in programs. 

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Caps and closures may be kept on plastic bottles and containers at the point of recycling. Caps are often made from #5 plastic and can usually be recycled through your curbside recycling program. Check with your local municipality.

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Most paperboard items are recyclable: Toilet paper rolls; cardboard boxes and cartons for over the counter drugs, lotions, soaps, bandages, etc.

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Toothbrushes are generally only recyclable through take-back programs, as most municipalities don’t accept them as recycling.

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Most bathroom tubes (toothpaste, etc.) are made with plastic laminate, which most   municipalities do not accept for recycling.

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Currently, the pumps on bottles are not recyclable due to the multiple components that are contained within a pump.  Please remove all pumps before recycling a bottle, then put the bottle in your recycling and the pump in your garbage.

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Dental floss containers are usually made with multiple parts of multiple materials, so they generally cannot be recycled, except via the mail-in and drop-off programs.

To learn more about Johnson and Johnson products you can recycle click here.

From These facts were developed in partnership with Recyclebank. Based on our research, we believe recycling facilities are available to a substantial majority (at least 60%) of consumers for #1 and #2 plastics. However, we still recommend that consumers check if recycling facilities exist in their communities and we encourage them to do this by using Earth911’s recycling locator.